Types of Hair Loss

Articles 8
Subject
Introduction (Hair Loss)
The word "alopecia" is the medical term for hair loss. Alopecia does not refer to one specific hair loss disease -- any form of hair loss is an alopecia. The word alopecia is Latin, but can be traced to the Greek "alopekia," which itself com...  
Effluviums file
Some hair loss conditions go by the name "effluvium," which means an outflow. Effluviums characteristically affect different phases of the hair growth cycle. Hair follicles on the scalp do not continuously produce hair. They cycle through a ...  
Alopecia areata file
Alopecia areata (AA) is probably the third most common form of hair loss dermatologists see, after androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium. The lifetime risk for AA is nearly 2%, or two in every 100 people will get AA at some point in th...  
Scarring Alopecia file
Scarring alopecia, also known as cicatricial alopecia, refers to a collection of hair loss disorders that may be diagnosed in up to 3% of hair loss patients. It occurs worldwide in otherwise healthy men and women of all ages. Each specific d...  
Congenital Hypotrichosis
Hypotrichosis is the term dermatologists use to describe a condition of no hair growth. Unlike alopecia, which describes hair loss where formerly there was hair growth, hypotrichosis describes a situation where there wasn't any hair grow...  
Infectious Agents
Ringworm . Ringworm has nothing to do with worms, it is actually a fungal infection. Ringworm is first and foremost an infectious skin condition and can occur anywhere on the body, but if it develops on the scalp it can cause patches of hair...  
Hair Shaft Defects
There are a multitude of conditions where physical damage to the hair fiber results in hair loss. Sometimes this damage to the hair fiber is due to the hair being improperly formed by the hair follicles. These conditions are usually determin...  
Summary
This section is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of what can cause hair loss, but other than androgenetic alopecia, most forms of alopecia affect relatively few people in the general population. Probably the most common non-AGA alopecias...